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ANTI- FRAUD HOTLINE
0860-JOBURG


PAIA, 2000 (Act 2 of 2000) 


home > Voluntary Organisations
 
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Animal Welfare and Rehabilitation Print E-mail
01 June 2007



Wildlife rescue and rehabilitation

FreeMe
FreeMe is a rehabilitation centre for indigenous wildlife based north of Johannesburg. The centre was founded in 1997 when it became apparent that there was not enough organised care for suburban indigenous wildlife.  Each year thousands of birds, mammals and reptiles living in gardens or suburbs become orphaned, sick or suffer injuries. Most veterinarians do not have facilities to cater for wildlife, leaving would-be rescuers unable to determine what to do with them. FreeMe filled this gap. Its motto is Rescue, Rehabilitate and Release and that is what it does for birds and animals ranging from chameleons to eland, snakes to meercats. FreeMe is a self-funded registered non-profit organisation, relying solely on the generosity of the public through donations, bequests, membership, sponsorship and voluntary assistance in all aspects.
 



138 Holkam Road
Paulshof
Tel:  011 807 6993
Fax: 011 807 6814
Email: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
Website: www.freemewildlife.org.za
 
Opening hours: Mondays to Sundays 8am to 5pm or, in case of emergencies, 24 hours a day at 083 558 5658.
 




Samaritans of the city's wildlife 

A nature reserve in the suburbs

SA National Bird of Prey Centre
The centre takes in injured birds of prey such as eagles, owls and sparrow hawks, and nurses them back to health. Those that can be returned to the wild are rehabilitated and set free, but some of the raptors handed in by the public or sent from other rehabilitation centres are too badly injured to survive in the wild. Their wings might be too badly broken or a leg may not have healed properly - and raptors kill with their feet. In such cases these birds of prey are kept at the centre. At the moment there are owls, kestrels, falcons, black sparrow hawks and eagles. The public can visit them there and attend demonstrations of their prowess, but booking is a good idea. The birds are also taken on school visits, where learners are told that these are indicator species - if there are no raptors in the area, it's an indication that there's something wrong in the environment.

The centre runs several other permanent establishments and has mobile teams, which move around the country, doing school visits, and demonstrations. The centre also does private functions and corporate team building, where synergies are drawn between eagles and corporations.

 



Forest Road

Inanda
Tel: 083 585 9540
Fax:  058 913 1816
Email: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it or This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
Website: www.birdsofprey.org.za

Opening hours: Sundays to Fridays 9am to 4pm
 


 

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Last Updated on 05 March 2013