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City of Johannesburg remember fallen heroes Print E-mail
13 November 2017
RemembranceSunday

Scores of people lined the streets of downtown Johannesburg to pay tribute to South Africa’s military men and women.

Along with the dignitaries and members of the diplomatic corps, members of the public gathered in the area for Remembrance Sunday commemoration in Johannesburg, which is the largest of its kind in South Africa and links with so-called “Poppy Day” events held in many countries around the world. The poppy is an international symbol for all those who died in wars and conflicts irrespective of which side they were on.

The City of Johannesburg remembered fallen soldiers, who lost their lives a century ago when the SS Mendi sank in the English Channel during the customary Remembrance Day Parade at the Cenotaph, Beyers Naude Square, in Johannesburg on Sunday 12 November 2017.

Anglican Church Dean of Johannesburg Reverend Xolani Dlwati delivered a short prayer, calling on God to remember all those who died in defence of justice and freedom.

Executive Mayor Cllr Herman and the Speaker of the Council, Cllr Vasco da Gama, joined South African National Defence Force senior officials, military veterans, members of the diplomatic corps and other dignitaries to lay wreaths in honour of those who have served in the South African National Defence Force and liberation movements.

Armed and unarmed uniformed groups were on parade, including the South African National Defence Force, South African Police Services, JMPD, Johannesburg Emergency Management Services, the military bands, the military veterans’ organisations, the Boy Scouts and Girl Guides groups.

This year marks exactly a century since the ship carrying hundreds of black South African troops being deployed to France to assist the allies during World War 1 sank in the English Channel. More than 600 men drowned as the SS Mendi sank in less than half an hour, most of the bodies were never found.

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