Libraries & Information Services Print
Library

Joining a library
All residents are welcome to join their local library. You need to present your identity book, with proof of residence. Children will also need to show their birth certificates.

Cards will be issued by the libraries. Those applying for the first time will have to wait for five working days for their documents to be processed.

For those wishing to take four or less books at any one time, membership is free.

For those wanting to take more than four books, it will cost R30 per year for membership.

JOHANNESBURG'S public libraries are hubs of education, giving residents access to books, magazines and audio-visual materials.

Besides lending out material, the City’s libraries offer a wide-range of other services including literacy classes, story telling sessions for youngsters, classroom support, gatherings for older residents and literary competitions.

They are also the venues for lectures, exhibitions, and talks.

Libraries can be found across the City’s seven regions, and mobile satellite centres also travel to far-flung areas.

The main library – the Johannesburg Public Library – is based in the city centre, in Market Street. It has over 1.5-million books in its collection and more than 250 000 members. 
 




Also on the premises are a number of specialist libraries:
  •    Central Reference Library
  •    Children’s Library
  •    Michaelis Art Library
  •    Multimedia Library
  •    Music Library
  •    Harold Strange Library of African Studies
  •    Newspaper Reading Room
  •    Cybase centre
  •    Young Adults' Reference Library

The Central Lending Library is open from Monday to Friday between 10am and 5pm, and on Saturdays from 9am to 1pm.

The Reference Library's hours are from 9am to 5pm on weekdays, and from 9am to 1pm on Saturdays. Apart from the main library in the centre of the city, there are many other libraries in the suburbs. 

There is also an Urban Resource Centre (previously the  Local Government Library) located on the 12th floor of the Metro Centre in Braamfontein. 
 



Our complete list of libraries provide contact details and opening hours:


The head office is in Region F at 22 Solomon Street, Braamfontein. The contact person is Nokwazi Mdlalose (PA to Director LIS) on 011 226 0953.



Find out more about the City’s library and information services

The core business of library and information services includes:

  •    Collection development and management (including bibliographic management)
  •    Provision of safe and free library facilities for reading and learning
  •    Provision of free and guided access to knowledge and information (including online access to library and other information resources)
  •    Development, promotion and maintenance of a reading culture through the delivering of programmes
  •    Ongoing research, planning, monitoring and evaluation to improve service delivery

The library and information services also offer a satellite library service to those communities with no access to a library service. The aim of the service is to increase and promote access to library services by providing suitable loan collections of books at designated areas. While the emphasis is on the elderly and the youth, this is not exclusive and other communities, for example, prisons are also serviced by satellite services. 
 


 

Strategic outcomes

Strategic objective

Programmes and projects

Ready to Read: early childhood reading development programme

Battle of the Books: primary schools’ reading development programme

The Story Skirmish

Joburg Libraries Psyched for Science

JoLife – the Johannesburg Literary Festival

Contacts


 << Back to Community Development


 


 

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Strategic outcomes

LIBRARY and information services is responsible for delivering library and information services to the residents of the City of Johannesburg. It plays a key-role in conforming to the developmental role of the City and contributes to the reading, learning and skills development of all its residents and has positioned itself to address the social, economic and cultural challenges facing the City’s communities.

In this regard, library and information services has identified the following medium to long-term outcomes:

  •     Library resources and services which include the provision of relevant information, lending and reference services, collection and facilities development and management and electronic information services
  •     Provision of literacy / numeracy facilities and services with computer based training programmes
  •     Early Childhood Development facilities and services where reading promotion programmes (Ready to Read) and family literacy programmes are prioritised
  •     Educational support services, such as science and technology awareness projects and campaigns (Psyched for Science) and school project support services and facilities as well as reading development programmes (Battle of the Books and Story Skirmish)
  •     Youth empowerment and life skills facilities through the development and implementation of career guidance services, reading development programmes and projects that support livelihood efforts (Business Information Centres)
     


Strategic objective

The aim of libraries and information services is to provide access and exposure so that a culture of reading and learning is promoted.

Literacy is something that has a positive effect throughout South African society and has been identified as being of particular importance.

Children have been earmarked for special attention. The aim is to have comprehensive children’s services in all libraries in disadvantaged areas.

 


<< Back to Community Development 


 

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Programmes and projects – the Big Five

LIBRARY and information services run five city-wide programmes embracing the strategic priorities noted in the City’s Human Development Strategy (2006):

 

  •     To build prospects for social inclusion amongst all Johannesburg communities
  •     To address inequalities through the championing of rights and opportunities, with special focus on women and children
  •     To improve access by poor and vulnerable households to library and information services

The programmes are:

  •     Ready to Read: early childhood reading development programme
  •     Battle of the Books: primary schools’ reading development programme
  •     The Story Skirmish
  •     Joburg Libraries Psyched for Science
  •     JoLife – the Johannesburg Literary Festival
     



Ready to Read: early childhood reading development programme

The Ready to Read programme is aimed at children who do not have access to books. The programme offers material for use in day-care centres, crèches and nursery schools, and also provides training in the selection and use of the material for both library staff and teachers.

The motivation for this focus is the vital role that pre-literacy skills play in children’s reading and general academic development. Early behaviours and skills associated with successful reading development are called pre-literacy. This umbrella term covers far more than a child's ability to identify letters, numbers, or shapes. It includes important skills such as oral language and phonological and phonemic awareness (the awareness of sounds), as well as knowledge of the alphabet and an understanding of common print concepts (print goes from left to right and from up to down on a page).  
 
The Ready to Read programme gives children in disadvantaged communities where homes are not language and print rich environments, a head start in preparation for reading and academic success at school by:

  •     Providing materials, in the form of picture and theme books in languages in use in the community;
  •     Providing training for library staff so that they are able to guide teachers in the use of the materials provided;
  •     Provide training to teachers in the use of the books provided, and giving guidance in the use of the materials provided through talks/ workshops and a manual to support the development of pre-literacy skills.

Book packs for loans to crèches or organised groups of pre-school children are purchased and provided. The books include:

  •     Picture story books in English and other languages in use in the community;
  •     Picture books based on themes of importance to pre-school children for example, colours, shapes, numbers, abc, nature study, life experiences and so on;
  •     Trained library staff to guide teachers in how to use the books with their children;
  •     A manual for teachers offering guidance in use of the materials.
     



Battle of the Books  
   
The Battle of the Books is a book-based inter-school, knock-out quiz.

The aims are to broaden children’s reading experience as well as to encourage cooperation between schools and libraries.

It is open to learners in Grades 6 and 7 in the greater Johannesburg region and is run by the City of Johannesburg library and information services.

Teams consist of 4-6 members with 1 or 2 reserves.

Between the participants, the team must read the 25 listed titles on which the quiz is based.

These books are carefully chosen (annually) by librarians to include a wide range of genres, levels of difficulty and writing styles and are provided to the schools by the library and information services.

At least half of the titles are South African in order to promote South African writers and develop a market that is receptive to South African literature. Schools may hold preliminary intra-school rounds to choose the team.  A list of questions, rules and sample score sheet are provided for this.  The first round takes place in the nearest participating library after the winter break with the final at the end of October.

It turns non-readers into readers and broadens the reading interests of those who read already.  Teachers have reported a noticeable improvement in comprehension skills and reading scores after the Battle.  And, what is more, it is fun.  Children love the cut and thrust of the Battles.  It gives learners who may not have the opportunity to represent their school in any other field a chance to do so as a member of the “Battle” team.

A general pattern is followed each year. The reading list is finalised in December for the next year. Schools have the first half of the year to read the books and hold intra-school rounds. At present there are three other rounds though if more schools enter it will be necessary to add an additional round. These rounds, the library, regional and metropolitan rounds take place between August and the end of October.

Prizes: All entrants are given certificates. Prizes depend on sponsorship received, for example, books and vouchers from Exclusive Books and Heinemann Publishers. There is a floating trophy called the De Beers Shield - the De Beers Trust supplied sponsorship when the trophy was first presented. 


The Story Skirmish

The Story Skirmish is based on the highly successful Battle of the Books. It is a much easier competition for younger, less skilled readers especially targeted at second language English speakers.

The readers are targeted from disadvantaged areas and they are given the chance to practice their reading skills while preparing for the enjoyable competition.

The books are carefully chosen by librarian specialists to ensure that they are easy and fun to read for second language learners. The books are supplied by LIS to the participating schools.
 
The Story Skirmish is a book based inter-school knock-out quiz. It is open to Grades 4 and 5 learners in schools in Johannesburg that cater for children for whom English is a second language.

Teams consist of 6 members with 1 or 2 reserves.  Between them they must read the 15 listed titles on which the quiz is based.  Schools may hold preliminary intra-school rounds to choose the team.  A list of questions, rules and sample score sheet are provided for this.

The first round takes place in the nearest participating library after the winter break with the final at the end of October.
 


Joburg Libraries Psyched for Science

Joburg Libraries Psyched for Science model building competition is a city-wide campaign planned in line with the City’s vision to alleviate the skills gap in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM).

It is also a method to create awareness of skills shortages, opportunities in STEM careers and contribute towards the Skills Development Strategy of the City. It aims to create partnerships among the social, economic and engineering departments of the Council and to link up with schools, tertiary institutions, learners and STEM companies in a coordinated campaign.

Most of the planned activities are directed at learners from disadvantaged areas in Grade 6 to Grade 12 as well as their educators.

The planned activities culminate in major events and outcomes during the National Science and Technology Week.



Activities:
a) Science Model Building Competition  
Participating Categories: Junior Secondary: Grade 8 and 9 and Senior Secondary: Grade 10 to 12 categories.

The competition is aimed at schools in disadvantaged areas.

  •     Encourage schools, teachers and learners to work as partners in designing and building science models explaining an existing physical law or a new invention;
  •     Learners use libraries and information resources (also the Internet) to broaden the knowledge they acquire in the classroom;
  •     Learners are encouraged to apply theory learnt in the classroom or through research, to solve problems in daily living;
  •     Learners are given the opportunity to explore their scientific and technologically creative abilities and the practical world of science;
  •     Learners participate in a “safe” environment - the campaign is not in competition with other initiatives of this kind such as the Eskom Expo for Young Scientists. Joburg Libraries Psyched for Science model building competition wants to assist in exposing our learners to STEM and to make them aware of their abilities and opportunities.
 
 


A minimum of 60 schools are targeted to participate per annum. A working relationship is established with science teachers at participating schools. Adjudicators select the city-wide winners in the various categories, as well as the best new invention and the best girl invention.
During the regional as well as the main event of the Joburg Libraries Psyched for Science model building competition:

  •     Exhibitions on STEM are held at designated libraries and for the main event at recreational centres and/or central facilities;
  •     The exhibitions are coupled with STEM career guidance and motivational talks by experts.
  •     Science demonstrations and interactive activities are organised at the regional and main events to bring the learners into contact with science “alive”.
  •     Workshops are presented at the main event to encourage learners to take up careers in STEM.
  •     Educator workshops are also organised to give educators an opportunity to enhance their science teaching skills.
     
 


b) Science quiz

The quiz is aimed at primary school learners in grades 6 and 7, specifically from schools in disadvantaged areas.

  •     Learners use libraries and information resources (also the Internet) to broaden the knowledge they acquire in the classroom.
  •     Learners in Grade 6 and 7 are encouraged to explore the various science information resources to obtain knowledge and information.
  •     The STEM knowledge of learners are broadened beyond their school textbooks.
  •     Learners in Grade 6 and 7 consider the importance of STEM when choosing secondary school subjects.
  •     The competition serves as a foundation for the learners to be able to enter the Joburg Libraries Psyched for Science model competition when they become secondary school learners.
  •     The quiz serves as a foundation to encourage learners to enter Joburg Libraries when they become secondary school learners.

A project team prepares the questions for all the rounds with the assistance of STEM educators and experts.
Schools in each region are invited to enter learners for the competition, with learners given time to read, learn and prepare.  


 School knock-out rounds are held to enable the school to enter a team made up of four (4) to six (6) learners against the other schools in the region (regional rounds).  Ten schools then enter per region for the first round.

  •     Six schools (teams) are eliminated and the top four then compete against one another in the second round.
  •     The regional winning school then participate in round three against the other regional winning teams/schools.
  •     One winning school will triumph at the final round.
  •     The quiz competition focuses on areas of STEM.
  •     Every year the focus is on a different area. For example 2008 will be dedicated to questions on technology and 2009 on engineering.

c) Special library collections on Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics
Special collections in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics for learners are being established at specific libraries within the City. The collections house materials in a special area within the libraries and is visibly displayed for the attention of the learners.
Library and information services has free access to e-resources (electronic) at the libraries. These resources include Internet and also form part of the STEM special resources. Educational CD–ROMs on topics of STEM are purchased to complement this collection.


JoLife – Joburg Literary Festival

Held during National Library Week each year, JoLife seeks to celebrate and appraise children’s literature, literature in indigenous languages, literary icons of the past and present as well as the importance of public libraries towards making literature more accessible to the community at large and as gateways towards reading, writing and learning.
 
Areas of focus:

  •     Know our literary heroes,
  •     The art of writing,
  •     Careers in writing and publishing,
  •     Public Libraries belong to all,
  •     Publish more children’s literature in indigenous languages,
  •     Parents/caregivers build readers, writers and scholars,
  •     Early Childhood Development needs books and reading,
  •     The City needs literate citizens.  

 JoLife was first held in 2006.  

  •     The programme provided for build up events during the National Library and Information Week and a weekend festival programme followed.
  •     The annual reading development projects, the Battle of the Books and Story Skirmish, are launched together with the official launching ceremony of the festival in the beginning of the week.
  •     During the week the public libraries participate actively and small-scale events are planned at a number of libraries over the city.
  •     Veteran authors conduct workshops in the many genres of literature, targeting young writers.
  •     Publishing forum discussions are arranged to involve local publishers, printers and authors in discussions on matters of concern.
  •     Book sales/exhibitions and career guidance seminars are arranged as well as a writing competition in age categories.
  •     The build up mini events are repeated and intensified over the festival weekend. Efforts are made to involve well-known speakers, storytellers, authors, publishers and literature experts over the weekend programme.
 
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Tariffs

Schedule of selected charges applicable from 01 July 2016 – 30 June 2017


 

 

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Contacts

Physical address:
Library & Information Services
22 Solomon Street
Braamfontein

Nobuntu Mpendulo
Director: Library and Information Services

Nokwazi Mdlalose
Executive secretary to the director
Tel: 011 226 0953
Fax: (011) 2260973

Rene van der Berg
Assistant Director: Office of the Director
Tel: 011 226 0951
Fax: 011 226 0973

Elize van der Westhuizen & Nola Agulhas
Managers: Bibliographic and Distribution Services
Tel: 011 226 0902/23

Karen Naude
Acting Assistant Director: Business Technology and Development
Tel: 011 226 0913
Fax: 011 226 0970
 




Atilla Lourens
Deputy Director: Service Extension and Resource Development
Tel: 011 226 0943/85
Fax: 011 226 0972

Tsakane Shiburi
Assistant Director: Community Advancement Services
Tel: 011 226 0944/52
Fax: 011 226 0972

Cavelle Carmicheal
Manager: Collection and Service Development
Tel: 011 226 0931
Fax: 011 226 0971/2





Corlia Saayman
Manager: Collection and Service Development
Tel: 011 226 0930
Fax: 011 226 0972

Sharon Mashau
Manager: Educational Support Services
Tel: 011 226 0935
Fax: 011 226 0972

Alenor Duarte
Manager: Satellite Services
Tel: 011 226 0944
Fax: 011 226 0972
 


Johannesburg City Library

Physical address:
Johannesburg City Library
Beyers Naude Square
Cnr Market and Fraser streets

Ben Ramela
Assistant director
Tel: 011 022 0916

Lending and Collection 
Tel: 011 022 0953

Lending: Young adults collection
Tel: 011 022 0935

Reference collection
Tel: 011 022 0958

Art collection
011 022 0913
 



Region A
Dieuwke Horne
Assistant Director
Tel: 011 761 0366
Fax: 011 472 0113

Miems Hattingh
Manager
Tel: 011 464 7023
Fax: 011 464 7088

Region B
Sarel Nienaber
Assistant Director
Tel: 011 718 9667
Fax: 011 718 9757
 




Susan Wiersch
Manager
Tel: 011 718 9670
Fax: 011 718 9757

Region C
Dieuwke Horne
Assistant Director
Tel: 011 761 0366
Fax: 011 472 0113





Ben Ramela
Manager
Tel: 011 761 0371
Fax: 011 472 0113

Region D
Tolakele Makalima
Assistant Director
Tel: 011 986 0039/ 0154
Fax: 011 930 3536

Captain Motimele
Manager
Tel: 011 932 6672
Fax: 011 932 6428

Region E
Ntombi Tladinyane
Assistant Director
Tel: 011 282 5903
Fax: 011 282 5916




Sonny Mothopeng
Manager
Tel: 011 282 5913
Fax: 011 282 5916

Region F
Lolo Masetlha
Manager
Cell: 0828572628

Maria Digoamaye
Manager
Cell: 083 239 0325
 




Region G

Shabir Bagus
Assistant Director
Tel: 011 211 0068
Fax: 011 211 0087

Sapna Ragunanan
Manager
Tel: 011 852 2763
Fax: 011 852 2763



 
Back to Community Development 

 

Nobuntu Mpendulo

Director: Library and Information Services

Tel: 011 226 0953

Fax: 011226 0973

 

Rene van der Berg

Assistant Director: Office of the Director

Tel: 011 226 0951

Fax: 011 226 0973

 

Elise Roberts

Assistant Director: Bibliographic and Distribution Services

Tel: 011 226 0901

Fax: 011 226 0970

 

Karen Naude

Acting Assistant Director: Business Technology and Development

Tel: 011 226 0913

Fax: 011 226 0970

 

Atilla Lourens

Deputy Director: Service Extension and Resource Development

Tel: 011 226 0934

Fax: 011 226 0972

 

Tsakani Shiburi

Assistant Director: Community Advancement Services

Tel: 011 226 0952

Fax: 011 226 0972

 

Cavelle Carmicheal

Manager: Collection and Service Development

Tel: 011 226 0931

Fax: 011 226 0971/2

 

Corlia Saayman

Manager: Collection and Service Development

Tel: 011 226 0930

Fax: 011 226 0972

 

Sharon Mashau

Manager: Educational Support Services

Tel: 011 226 0935

Fax: 011 226 0972

 

Alenor Duarte

Manager: Satellite Services

Tel: 011 226 0944

Fax: 011 226 0972

 

Region A

Dieuwke Horne

Assistant Director

Tel: 011 761 0366

Fax: 011 472 0113

 

Miems Hattingh

Manager

Tel: 011 464 7023

Fax: 011 464 7088

 

Region B

Sarel Nienaber

Assistant Director

Tel: 011 718 9667

Fax: 011 718 9757

 

Susan Wiersch

Manager

Tel: 011 718 9670

Fax: 011 718 9757

 

Region C

Dieuwke Horne

Assistant Director

Tel: 011 761 0366

Fax: 011 472 0113

 

Ben Ramela

Manager

Tel: 011 761 0371

Fax: 011 472 0113

 

Region D

Tolakele Makalima

Assistant Director

Tel: 011 986 0039/ 0154

Fax: 011 930 3536

 

Captain Motimele

Manager

Tel: 011 932 6672

Fax: 011 932 6428

 

Region E

Ntombi Tladinyane

Assistant Director

Tel: 011 282 5903

Fax: 011 282 5916

 

Sonny Mothopeng

Manager

Tel: 011 282 5913

Fax: 011 282 5916

 

Region F

Lolo Masetlha

Manager

Cell: 0828572628

 

Maria Digoamaye

Manager

Cell: 083 239 0325

 

Region G

Shabir Bagus

Assistant Director

Tel: 011 211 0068

Fax: 011 211 0087

 

Sapna Ragunanan

Manager

Tel: 011 852 2763

Fax: 011 852 2763

 

Johannesburg Central Library

Alistair Marshall

Manager

Cell: 082 464 9517

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